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Darren J. Ray

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Reply with quote  #16 

Shows how quickly technology changes. ‘Shine On You Crazy Diamond’ was used back in Season II in 2011. But only Part I was used as YouTube clips couldn’t be longer than 10 minutes then!

I’ll be honest. These songs had me misty-eyed and nostalgic, yearning for the good old days of the Battle that featured the likes of Gilbert O’Sullivan and William Shakespeare.


Gold - Isn’t It A Pity (Version One) (George Harrison - 1970)  
Like the rest of the album, overblown, occasionally preachy and unnecessarily long. I know Paul and Tom are gonna love it, but I can totally understand the other Beatles rejecting it earlier. Sorry, George.

It’s interesting that both Phil Collins and Peter Frampton both claim to have played on the All Things Must Pass album yet neither was listed on the long list of credits on the original release.

Collins’ omission was rectified with the 2001 re-release but Frampton’s name has never appeared on it. 

Now, for the first time, I can reveal the inside story. 

By 1970, George was tired of the Beatles. 

He was sick of the association. He certainly didn’t wish to be referred to as a Beatle; not even as an ex-Beatle. 

He was looking to be recognised as a solo artist, working with musicians other than the ego-driven Lennon & McCartney. 

Peter Frampton was one such young musician that George was excited at the prospect of working with. 

When Harrison and Frampton had finished recording the new single for George's first post-Beatles album, Harrison looked over at Frampton. 

“What do you think? A bit more sophisticated than that 'yeah, yeah, yeah' and ‘Hey Jude’ crap, isn't it?” 

Frampton had a different opinion but didn't know if he should offer it. 

Harrison persisted. Frampton relented.

“Seems to me like we've just played that song by the Chiffons, 'He's So Fine'. Sounds just like it. Same changes”. 

Harrison was furious. “Where does a nobody like you come off accusing me – a goddamn BEATLE - of plagiarising? If you weren't so bloody deaf, you'd realise that I just wrote a pop song about the Lord, Jesus Christ. That's never been done before! You think I would break one of the Ten Commandments and steal a bloody tune, then dedicate that same song to the Lord?” 

Only the knock on the studio door by Phil Spector stood between Harrison's hands and Frampton’s neck. Frampton bolted out the door and left Harrison fuming. 

Which is why up to his passing, George denied Frampton's involvement with the album and why he was virtually the only musician, still living, who'd worked with Harrison who was not invited to participate in the Concert for George.

(John B may recall a similar thing happened when George presented the song to Del Shannon in the green room of The Ed Sullivan Show as early as 1964, as reported by Mark Shipper in Paperback Writer.)

Silver - Heroes and Villains (Parts 1 & 2) (The Beach Boys - 1966 & 1967/2011)
The whole Smile thing ultimately frustrates me. The inaccessible lyrics, the contradicting reasons as to why it wasn’t released and never really finished, the multiple versions of the same song. It’s just all too confusing, it does my brain in.

Bronze - The Rain Song (Led Zeppelin - 1973)
I’m sure ‘Stairway to Heaven’ would’ve fared better this week, not that I’m into any of this band’s songs. Stories of them ripping off old blues artists and others doesn’t endear to them either. But it’s shorter than…..

Participant - Shine On You Crazy Diamond (Parts I-V) (Pink Floyd - 1975)
Just another brick.


Here’s a long, long, long version of a George song. Good luck getting through this…

 

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t bedford

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Reply with quote  #17 
The Beatles/Hey Jude clip is from The David Frost Show.

Not quite as lengthy as the Fabs, but 3 years earlier, Bob Dylan's single "Like a Rolling Stone" clocked in at 6:00...

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Lee Marshall

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Reply with quote  #18 
"By 1970, George was tired of the Beatles. 

He was sick of the association. He certainly didn’t wish to be referred to as a Beatle; not even as an ex-Beatle. 

He was looking to be recognised as a solo artist, working with musicians other than the ego-driven Lennon & McCartney. 

Peter Frampton was one such young musician that George was excited at the prospect of working with. 

When Harrison and Frampton had finished recording the new single for George's first post-Beatles album, Harrison looked over at Frampton. 

“What do you think? A bit more sophisticated than that 'yeah, yeah, yeah' and ‘Hey Jude’ crap, isn't it?” 

Frampton had a different opinion but didn't know if he should offer it. 

Harrison persisted. Frampton relented.

“Seems to me like we've just played that song by the Chiffons, 'He's So Fine'. Sounds just like it. Same changes”. 

Harrison was furious. “Where does a nobody like you come off accusing me – a goddamn BEATLE - of plagiarising? If you weren't so bloody deaf, you'd realise that I just wrote a pop song about the Lord, Jesus Christ. That's never been done before! You think I would break one of the Ten Commandments and steal a bloody tune, then dedicate that same song to the Lord?” 

Only the knock on the studio door by Phil Spector stood between Harrison's hands and Frampton’s neck. Frampton bolted out the door and left Harrison fuming. 

Which is why up to his passing, George denied Frampton's involvement with the album and why he was virtually the only musician, still living, who'd worked with Harrison who was not invited to participate in the Concert for George.
"
--------------------------------------------------

Doesn't sound at all like George Harrison...at least not the 'exchange' presented here with Peter.  Where did THIS come from Darren? You OK?
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John B

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Reply with quote  #19 
He's just riffin' on this funny book, Lee, called "Paperback Writer."

okay, to my votes, which are easy.

1. "Heroes & Villains"  maybe the ultimate version(s).  Darren: what is so inaccessible about the lyrics to this song?   It's California western iconic, plus some Brian autobio, too.

2. "Shine on You, Crazy Diamond"

kind of a film score for quite a long while, then I actually like the part of the song where the singing starts.  but that's about what?  Minute 8?   As for the lyrics, what do they mean, kds, since it is your favorite?

3. "Isn't it a Pity" by George.  What a boring song.  I was almost going to place it 4th and say "Isn't it a Pity" (George made a song worse than Led Zep).  But alas...I could not.

4.  perhaps because my hatred of Led Zep knows no bounds (except U2 below them, that's the only bounds).  "Rain Song".   Supposedly Prince liked this song.  Why?
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kds

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Reply with quote  #20 
John,

Roger Waters wrote the lyrics to Shine On You Crazy Diamond about co founder Syd Barrett, who was ousted from Pink Floyd in 1968 due to mental issues compounded by drug abuse (long story short on Syd, think Brian Wilson without the happy ending).  The guys from Floyd apparently felt terrible about ditching Syd, and Waters, David Gilmour, and Richard Wright even tried to help Syd launch a solo career in the early 1970s, with mixed results.  

The spectre of Syd continued to appear in their music, and they wrote the long piece, which they debuted on tour in 1974 while they were still promoting Dark Side of the Moon, as album whose lyrical theme is madness, and likely inspired by Syd "When the band you're in starts playing different tunes."  

One of the most legendary stories in Floyd lore occurs when Floyd were recording Shine On and an unrecognizable Syd Barrett paid an unexpected, unannounced visit to the studio.  He'd shaved his head and eyebrows, put on a lot of weight, and sat silently brushing his teeth repeatedly.  That was the last time anyone from Floyd ever saw Syd, who lived his remaining days with his mother. 

Syd, apparently hated to be reminded of his Floyd past, which is why the other guys avoided contact, and insisted to be called by his given name Roger.  His brain was apparently literally damaged by his LSD intake, and he was really never the same person again.  He died in 2006 due to complications from diabetes.  

Oddly enough, Shine On You Crazy Diamond is the last real band collaboration when Roger Waters was still in the group.  After the 1975 Wish You Were Here album, which is bookended by Shine On Part 1 and Part 2, Waters dominated the next three albums before going solo in 1984.  

Here's Part 2.  




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John B

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Reply with quote  #21 
Wow, thanks for studious explanation of the lyrics, kds!   the punks liked Syd B, the most of all PF.
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kds

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Reply with quote  #22 
No problem.  Syd sort of look on cult status.  His work with Floyd is probably more admired by punk, indie, alternative fans than Floyd's later work.  

Even though Floyd had their most success in the 1970s, there are Syd devotees that swear that Pink Floyd ended that day in April 1968 when the band decided fire Syd.  Personally, I like all eras of Floyd, so I'll listen to any arguments for any era. 

Syd references continued to pop up throughout Floyd's career.  Even on the last album they released as an active band - 1994's The Division Bell.  

This is kind of a long song.  It's called Poles Apart, and the first verse references Syd Barrett, and the second references Roger Waters.

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Lee Marshall

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Reply with quote  #23 
Here's another long one John might [love] L O V E. [love] 

  

I know ***I***  do.  Up 'til this point in 1968 there had NEVER been anything quite this avante guarde and straight up rrrrrrrrrRRRRockinnnn' sound...at least not like THIS.  The production techniques alone were groundbreaking.  It was like the Yardbirds on MEGA STEROIDS.  The guitar work and drums alone were earth shatteringly out of sight...and never before had there been a singer who could wail and take it from 0 to 500 in 2 seconds flat like Robert.  NO ONE came even close.  50 years later...he's STILL got the 'goods'.  He's just more interesting now that he's left Page behind to settle the lawsuits. 

Ya George borrowed a ton from He's So Fine for My Sweet Lord.  'Stuff' happens.  But Jimmy did it so often that it ultimately became remarkable.  [and expensive.]

Anyway...6:31 is a shorty.  Here's a LONG one from the sand-pail sailors.  Thanks...for nuthin' Bruce...

It's 11:20 seconds of what eventually becomes aural torture...



It's far easier to tolerate when it's done like this...



But then...why would Bruce have fiddled with perfection to begin with?



2:49  Small packages win again.


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John B

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Reply with quote  #24 
and Kate Bush likes David Gilmore so...

They were creative.  So, I'm really not sure why I never felt more of a connection to the group. 

btw, before we leave the subject of lyrics, what was the "pity" that George Harrison was referencing?  He complained a lot of the English tax system for the well-do-do rock star.  Was that it?
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Lee Marshall

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Reply with quote  #25 
Isn't it a pity that we treat each other the way we do?  If only we weren't such idiots.  But...alas...we are.  Isn't it a pity... ... ...indeed.
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John B

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Reply with quote  #26 
You know, about 'Dazed and Confused', I have a story that would predate that movie and Spinal Tap as well.  I was in high school, on the journalism staff and wrote a review of the Bay City Rollers 1st album that was rather like 'Paperback Writer'.  I praised the Rollers for going further than Dylan had at that point with Hasidic philosophy, as they spelled out the day of the week to keep the Sabbath.  Then, I praised them for their clever spin of pastoral philosophy, only instead of preference for the country over the city, the Rollers professed their love of the night over the day, such as in 'Let's Go Huggin and a kissin in the Moonlight.'  Then, I thought it was extremely profound that they covered a similarly serious 60's group, the 4 Seasons with their bittersweet farewell to peace as the Vietnam War overtook the U.S., "Bye Bye Baby."   and so forth.  Well, my journalism editors liked the piece and wanted to print it.  They did not laugh or even smile.  The headline was something like "Rollers praised for uplifting songs about the Jewish faith, pastoral themes, and protests of U.S. involvement in Wars."  I wrote this as very long and way too detailed for print, but they reduced it to only about 5 or 6 end of paragraph declarative sentences, rendering it not nearly as funny (and maybe more insulting to the Rollers, which was not my point).

...so I apologized and begged them not to run the article.  Instead, I quickly wrote one shorter, that they printed.  it was about a group I just made up on the spot, called 'Daze' and their album was entitled "Summer Daze (and Summer Knights!!").   I said they did hard rock not unlike Led Zeppelin, such as in rockers like "(Sell my Soul to) Hot Ladies on the Road," their glorious 20 minute feedback instrumental "Tailspin", and their achingly beautiful ballad "Sister Pain."   No one at my school ever questioned the article.  It printed and I never told them until now that there was really no such group.
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Larry Franz

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Reply with quote  #27 
"Brevity is the soul of wit."

of Montreal, "The Past Is a Grotesque Animal" (11:53)


Tame Impala, "Let It Happen" (7:48)


My Morning Jacket, "Touch Me I'm Going To Scream, Pt. 2"  (8:12)


Sufjan Stevens, "Oh God Where Are You Now? (In Pickerel Lake? Pigeon? Marquette? Mackinaw?)" (9:24)


Van Morrison, "Madame George" (9:45)


The Beach Boys, "'Til I Die" alternate version (7:23)


Remember, it's a rule that the host has to listen to every song that's posted. Or is it?

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kds

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Reply with quote  #28 
Quote:
Originally Posted by John B
and Kate Bush likes Roger Waters so...

They were creative.  So, I'm really not sure why I never felt more of a connection to the group. 

btw, before we leave the subject of lyrics, what was the "pity" that George Harrison was referencing?  He complained a lot of the English tax system for the well-do-do rock star.  Was that it?   


Floyd's David Gilmour was actually pretty instrument in Kate Bush getting a record contract.  I think he even played guitar on a few tracks early in her career.  

Speaking of Dazed and Confused, I got to see a great live version by the Jim McCarty / Chris Dreja lead Yardbirds back in 2006 (or 2007).  Great stuff.  


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bonnie bella

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Reply with quote  #29 
Hi Jenny.

Two long songs that immediately come to mind.

"Free Bird" (what else?) 



New Order "Blue Monday".


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John B

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Reply with quote  #30 
thanks for correction, kds.  ! 
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