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kds

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Reply with quote  #31 
Quote:
Originally Posted by John B
thanks for correction, kds.  ! 


Well, she could like Roger, who knows?  
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Larry Franz

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Reply with quote  #32 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bonnie bella

New Order "Blue Monday".


Hi bonnie -- That one didn't play in the US. This one does:



Other long ones:

The War on Drugs, "Under the Pressure" (8:52)


My Morning Jacket, "Only Memories Remain" (7:10)


Buffalo Springfield, "Bluebird" (long version) (9:00)


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Darren J. Ray

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Reply with quote  #33 
Quote:
Doesn't sound at all like George Harrison...at least not the 'exchange' presented here with Peter.  Where did THIS come from Darren? You OK? 


Lee, you're a media person. You know a good reporter never divulges his sources. 

Which is why I did at the bottom of the story. I'm not a good reporter!


John B, your reviews sound much like my Peter Frampton story. I would've let them print the first one.  

But...
Quote:
Darren: what is so inaccessible about the lyrics to this song?


Once at night Catillion squared the fight
And she was right in the rain of the bullets that eventually brought her down
But she's still dancing in the night
Unafraid of what a dude'll do in a town full of heroes and villains

Huh?


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Al Forsyth

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Reply with quote  #34 
Ah, just one more long one from me and the GREAT band, Yes:

Darren, there's a LOT here to digest regarding the lyrics:
http://www.goodhumorsmile.com/page22.htm
Don't get all Mike Lovey on us here.  They are artistic statements but supporting what?

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t bedford

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Reply with quote  #35 
Jethro Tull - Thick as a Brick (43:47)

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Lee Marshall

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Reply with quote  #36 
Marcel Marceau...78 hours/53 minutes/19 seconds...>  xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx [wink]
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kds

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Reply with quote  #37 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Darren J. Ray


Lee, you're a media person. You know a good reporter never divulges his sources. 

Which is why I did at the bottom of the story. I'm not a good reporter!


John B, your reviews sound much like my Peter Frampton story. I would've let them print the first one.  

But...

Once at night Catillion squared the fight
And she was right in the rain of the bullets that eventually brought her down
But she's still dancing in the night
Unafraid of what a dude'll do in a town full of heroes and villains

Huh?




Thank goodness I'm not the only one who feels this way about Smile's lyrics.  
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Lee Marshall

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Reply with quote  #38 
In order for lyrics to work...as fine art...not unlike poetry...it has to be significantly more than just a paint by numbers exercise all of the time.  Surely Brian's unique music, arrangements and creativity deserve more than just duh duh duh, duh duh, duh duh duh, duh duh, a bow bow bow bow, and good night my baby/sleep tight my baby-style basic, pedestrian simplicity all the while/ad infinitum?

No wonder he said that the world wasn't ready for SMiLE.  William Shakespeare still had to weigh-in. 

Note:  Gas station attendants shouldn't be expected to understand the complex...no matter how good they once were at track and field....no matter how many hats they wear.  And I'll bet he doesn't even know who Bartholomew Cubbins is.  And why should he?  Cubbins only owned 500 of 'em.  [and unlike the walkin', talkin' helipad ol' Bart couldn't get rid of 'em fast enough.]
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paul g adsett

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Reply with quote  #39 
it'll be a long long week, if any of us were to listen to all of these...
i'll give a spin to a few i've not listened to in a long while
and some i've not familiar with.
out of competition,
the magnificent mike heron & trembling bells 'a very cellular song'
currently hits number 2 spot,
not least 'cos heron's a longtime hero and i can call the bells chums.
no 1 is the incomparable 'madame george'
'supper's ready' remains one of the prog tracks i can (and do) still listen to
with no sense of embarrassment.
'blue monday' - still enjoy it, but supersceded by several other new order tracks.
'roundabout' - it took me years to enjoy yes i do like this.
'bluebird' - magnificent.

how about this one - one of the band's best compositions:

and, another favourite, not overlong, but wonderfully langorous:


cheers
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Darren J. Ray

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Reply with quote  #40 
Lee, George's hostility towards Peter only got worse when the Beatles re-formed briefly in 1979 and had to take second billing on an ill-fated concert tour...

shipper04
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Lee Marshall

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Reply with quote  #41 
Plus...Peter Frampton was actually Peter Frampton...like George was George John was John and Richie Starkey was Ringo... ... ...

Then there was Faul.  ["1 and 1 and 1 is 3" after all]
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kds

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Reply with quote  #42 
Iron Maiden is a metal band with proggy roots.  The members are big fans of Genesis and King Crimson among others.  So, it's not surprising they have a lot of long songs in their catalog including this early gem - Hallowed By Thy Name (7:12)



One of their more well known epics is the metal version of Rime of the Ancient Mariner (13:42)



As their career progressed, the number of long songs per album increased.  One of my favorites is Dream of Mirrors from 2000 (9:21)



Their all time longest song is also their most recent.  The closing track from their 2015 Book of Souls album, Empire of the Clouds (18:11)

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Darren J. Ray

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Reply with quote  #43 
I'm seeing Paul in exactly a month today.

If it's not really him, I'll let you know. 
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John B

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Reply with quote  #44 
She's still dancing in the night unafraid... (after the rain of the bullets that gunned her down).


in our memories, we remember her courage?  her spirit?  as part of legend?   myth and history? 


I mean, is this really so hard?
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GGH

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Reply with quote  #45 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Marshall
In order for lyrics to work...as fine art...not unlike poetry...it has to be significantly more than just a paint by numbers exercise all of the time.  Surely Brian's unique music, arrangements and creativity deserve more than just duh duh duh, duh duh, duh duh duh, duh duh, a bow bow bow bow, and good night my baby/sleep tight my baby-style basic, pedestrian simplicity all the while/ad infinitum?

No wonder he said that the world wasn't ready for SMiLE.  William Shakespeare still had to weigh-in. 

Note:  Gas station attendants shouldn't be expected to understand the complex...no matter how good they once were at track and field....no matter how many hats they wear.  And I'll bet he doesn't even know who Bartholomew Cubbins is.  And why should he?  Cubbins only owned 500 of 'em.  [and unlike the walkin', talkin' helipad ol' Bart couldn't get rid of 'em fast enough.]

I agree. I have the same problem with many of my friends. They only care for something catchy, probably on account of the fact that their brains make peas look like boulders. Music is art, and some of the most interesting art is abstract. If something doesn't make you think, did the artist really do a good job? Poetry isn't direct. Why tell a basic story when you can embellish it so much more and go so much deeper? The same goes for lyrics. Poets and musicians, good ones anyway, write in between the lines. Not everyone can read that.

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