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Lee Marshall

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Reply with quote  #31 
That's the guy Cindy.  And look...he's green with envy AND wearing a hat too.  [rolleyes] Gotta be the man who sang the 'stick' song.
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bonnie bella

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Reply with quote  #32 
t, "Small Circle of Friends" was just plain creepy.
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t bedford

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Reply with quote  #33 
bonnie, the lyrics are satirical, but if you are referring to the first verse, it was based on an actual occurrence, here is the article: http://www.nytimes.com/1964/03/27/37-who-saw-murder-didnt-call-the-police.html. It has, apparently, come out in recent years that said article was "flawed": https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Murder_of_Kitty_Genovese

Here's two anti-war tunes by Phil Ochs
Draft Dodger Rag


I Ain't Marching Anymore


And here's the saddest anti-war song I know:
The Kinks - Some Mothers Son:



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Larry Franz

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Reply with quote  #34 
Two familiar ones:

Creedence Clearwater Revival, "Fortunate Son", Willy and the Poor Boys, 1969



Neil Young, "Rockin' in the Free World", Freedom, 1989



Two less familiar ones:

The Almanac Singers (including Woody Guthrie and Pete Seeger), "Get Thee Behind Me, Satan", 1941



Radiohead, "Idioteque", Kid A, 2000



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Tom Tobben

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Reply with quote  #35 
Excellent battle week, Cindy. There are certainly plenty of excellent protest songs from over the years, whether they be about war, discrimination, or other types of social protest. Here are few that come to mind, which I don't think have been mentioned yet:

One of Sam Cooke's last songs, "A Change Is Gonna Come", released soon after his untimely death, is now a classic regarding racial discrimination and hope for a better future:


Stevie Wonder released "Pastime Paradise", a song about discrimination, as just one of many excellent songs on his classic double album Songs in the Key of Life. (Some of you will also recognize the song as having been heavily sampled/emulated in Coolio's big rap hit "Gangsta's Paradise" from the Dangerous Minds movie soundtrack, and which was also the overall best-selling song in the US in 1995.)


And early in his long career, Randy Newman released a couple very compelling songs about racial discrimination and the exploitation of slavery. First, the ironic title song from his classic album Sail Away, which is narrated from the perspective of a slave trader trying to convince minorities from other countries to come with him to America:


Even more biting is this harsh song about the reality of racial discrimination in the US (and not just in the old American South), "Rednecks", from Randy Newman's excellent 1974 album Good Old Boys. (Warning: some of you may find some of Newman's social protest lyrics offensive, particularly his use of the "n" word to emphasize the bitter reality of racial segregation):



I'll be back later this week to cast my votes after considering further this week's battle songs, but I'm virtually certain that Billie Holiday's powerfully candid "Strange Fruit" will get the gold for me. Here she is singing it live:



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Larry Franz

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Reply with quote  #36 
Two by angry young man Elvis Costello:

"Pills and Soap", 1983



"Radio Radio", This Year's Model, 1978



One by not as angry or young man Bruce Springsteen:

"American Skin (41 Shots)", High Hopes, 2014 



It's hard to believe that Bruce is 66 years old. I protest!

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t bedford

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Reply with quote  #37 
Dewey Cox is Bob Dylan in Walk Hard:
"What do your parents think about my protest songs, Mr. Time Magazine?"


Bob Dylan & Alan Price (the Animals) talk Donovan:

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John B

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Reply with quote  #38 
Larry:

Do you consider Graham Parker's Los-Angeles insult song 'Stupefaction' to be a protest song?  It's quite critical and some would say 'angry'.  I mean, if 'I'm So Bored With the USA' by the Clash is, then I'd say it is.
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Al Forsyth

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Reply with quote  #39 
The Revolution IS being televised, now, Gil:


Protesters:  Pete Seeger, of course, and Joan B.  and company and the war WAS televised:


McGuinn and McGuire were catching fire and gettin' higher


Votes:

Gold to Billie Holiday - a song that you can't even describe really.  So the lyric will do it instead. Powerful.

Silver - to Bob and Peter and his boys - don't give up the fight.  The infectious groove.
Bronze to a band that WAS involved in what was Vietnam and protested in their own way - far more than others did, the BB's.
http://reasonabledoubt.org/criminallawblog/entry/january-3-1967-beach-boy-carl-wilson-becomes-draft-dodger-today-in-crime-history
They would perform "community service" concerts.  Good slow groove to Riot In Cell Block Nine.
Tinner to Barry who reminds us over and over and over and over.  Protest music shouldn't be pop music, but was.



I can't really protest anything now - except current pop music.

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Cindy Hood

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Reply with quote  #40 
TGIF, folks!

I'll go ahead and cast my votes while things are lagging.

GOLD:  Barry McGuire for Eve of Destruction.  I like the roughness in his voice, the melody and lyrics leave quite an impact.  With all the destruction, fighting in the middle east and terrorist activity with ISIS all over the world, it seemed appropriate to select this song for this week's battle.  

SILVER:  Billie Holiday for Strange Fruit.  A very solemn and haunting feel to it.  I can't help but feel the anguish of the situation back in the 30's about the racist activity that was going on back then.  What a sharp contrast to what is going on today.

BRONZE:  The Beach Boys for Student Demonstration Time.  I like it.  It's got the protest thing going on, but with a much lighter vibe.  It just didn't pack the punch that my first two choices made.

TIN/PEWTER: Bob Marley for Get Up, Stand Up.  A good song, yet it is too repetitive and does get boring halfway into it.  I do like his message, however.

My final answer




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Larry Franz

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Reply with quote  #41 
John B -- That's a very good question. The Oxford Concise Dictionary of Music defines "protest song" as a:
Quote:
Term which gained currency (first in USA) in 1960s for song which voiced feelings of protest about some social or political injustice, real or imagined, or about some int[eresting?]. event which aroused strong emotions, e.g. Amer. part in Vietnam war. 

On the other hand, the Cambridge Dictionary defines it as "a song that expresses disapproval, usually about a political subject".

So "Masters of War" and "Ohio" are clearly protest songs. "Stupefaction" is less political on its face, but certainly implies that the vapid residents of L.A. (of which I used to be one) aren't sufficiently engaged with the world's problems. "I'm So Bored With the USA" includes the lyric "Yankee dollar talk, To the dictators of the world" so it's more explicitly political. But I'd say they're both protest songs, since they express disapproval of human behavior from a political or social perspective.

I wouldn't say that any song of complaint is a protest song, of course. "You're No Good" is too personal. "Poison Ivy", although it makes an excellent point, doesn't have a human target.

Graham Parker and the Rumour, "Stupefaction":



Which brings to mind this other song that most people probably don't think of as a protest song, yet it qualifies by protesting radio and TV advertising (not by complaining about lack of success with "some girl").

The Rolling Stones, "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction", 1965



While we're on the subject:

The Beach Boys, "A Day in the Life of a Tree"



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paul g adsett

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Reply with quote  #42 
two versions of a reflective song that looks at
the repercussions, human and economic, of war-mongering,
written at the tiime of the malvinas / falklands war. 
'shipbuilding'
written by elvis costello and clive langer
(better known for his more jolly production work with alan winstanley
on madness recordings, as well as many many artists)

frst, robert wyatt's more wistful arrangement,
then the majestic elvis costello and the attractions
that includes a thoroughly sublime trumpet break by chet baker:

https://www.youtube com/watch?v=Res3-YX4X8g

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paul g adsett

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Reply with quote  #43 
here's a few dedicated to a 'lady' sic(ker than most) 
patently held dear by us brits...
first, elvis costello, with measured venom,
considers what he'd do on her demise
(and, when the event eventually came, many would've happily joined in):
'tramp the dirt down'


next, morrissey wistfully urges us
'good people, have a wonderful dream...' 'margaret on the guillotine'
 
and so, it's up to hefner to lead the mourners: 
'the day that thatcher dies (ding dong! the witch is dead)'
(the original 'wizard of oz' song almost reached the top of the charts
when she popped her clogs in 2013).


but, let's end on an earlier song,
performed in front of an audience that didn't quite know how to react
- the (english) beat suggest, in ska form, 'stand down, margaret':
 
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John B

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Reply with quote  #44 
thanks, Larry!  

I like those definitions.  They explain why I did not cite 'Stay Free' or 'Safe European Home' even though the Clash were clearly trying to write like Dylan at that time.   

Could have said 'In the City' (about the people in uniforms who think they have the right to kill a man).   or 'Down in the Tube Station at Midnight'  ('they smelt of pubs, and Wormwood scrubs and too many right wing meetings...hey boy, they said, have you got any money? 'a little money and a take away curry...I first felt a hit, and then a kick, my life swam around me...').or 'Going Underground' ('you see kidney machines replaced with rockets and guns'), by The Jam. 

'So Many Tears" by Tupac  ('God knows I've tried, been a witness to homicide, drive-bys taken lives little kids die, wonder why as I walk by, broken hearted as I walk past the chalk-lines, getting high...').  'Brenda's Gotta a Baby'.  2-Short, besides 'The Ghetto' always loved "I Want to be Free" ("but I'm not mad, I'm just black").  GREAT line.!

Propaganda by Dead Prez. !  If that's not a protest song, then there is no such thing as one.

Right, Paul, thanks! of course, Morrissey!  So many, 'Meat is Murder' very explicitly...even 'Nowhere Fast' 'Panic!' and '(Hector Was the) First in the Gang to Die'..."and he stole from the rich and the poor and the not very rich and the very poor..."  (Way to go, Hector.)

But the most timely song right now is "Mexico":


In Mexico, I went for a walk
to inhale the tranquil, cool, lover's air
But I could taste a trace of
American
Chemical waste and a
small voice said
'what can we do?'

In Mexico, I went for a walk
to inhale the tranquil, cool, lover's air
But I could sense the hate from the
Lone Star State and a
small voice said
'what can we do?'

Oh, It seems if you're rich and you're white
You think you're so right
I just don't see why this should be so

If you're rich and you're white
You think you're so right
I just don't see why this should be so

In Mexico, I lay on the grass and I
Cried my heart out for
Want of my love, oh


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Al Forsyth

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Reply with quote  #45 
Paul and Pete and ALL from the UK - wasn't THIS a protest song:

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