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t bedford

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Reply with quote  #16 
First the votes...hard to order these Tom, good job!

Devo - Where is Booji (pronounced "Boogie") Boy when we need him? Back in 1978, they were on SNL, and my father was 61. So I was over at my parents house the next day, and Dad asked me, if they were "a real band, or an SNL put on". I loved telling him that not only were they real, they were from Akron (only about 40 miles from CLE).

SILVER for the Mothers - That is Frank (and not Ringo) playing drums in the video, but I'm fairly certain that the drum track is Ansley Dunbar, also seen wearing a tan (maybe leather?) top, and playing drums. I hope John B didn't think Jimmy Carl Black was a Californian faking an accent. Jimmy was born in El Paso. But fake country singers with that awful generic accent (they don't really know any better, but that's no excuse) are hilarious. Right, Darren? [wink]

BRONZE for the Monkees - I too was a little too old for the Monkees music, altho' I liked the show. I appreciate their musical output now, way more than then.

TIN for the Beach Boys - Just not a record I can get very excited about. The contractual obligation record.

Then a couple more songs:
You've heard the paternal version....now for the maternal side of Oom-Mow-Mow:


Our Canadian Jewish pal, the late Zal Yanovsky, had a song about Argentina:


And of course, the only interplanetary dance craze I'm aware of:



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Larry Franz

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Reply with quote  #17 
Wow, "Martian Hop". Haven't heard that one recently. But who could forget that opening rhyme, "an important note from space", "a dance for all the human race"? 

In March 1969, the Rolling Stones recorded "Country Honk". In July of that year, they released "Honky Tonk Women", a far superior version, as a single. It went to #1. In September, it was included on one of their greatest hits albums. Two months later, they released Let It Bleed. It included "Country Honk", not their big hit. Keith Richards has been quoted as saying:
Quote:
On Let It Bleed, we put that other version of "Honky Tonk Women" on because that's how the song was originally written, as a real Hank Williams/Jimmie Rodgers, '30s Country song. 

Sorry, Keith, but what's your point? "Country Honk" kind of sucks.



In a similar vein, Elvis Costello released an album of country music covers, Almost Blue, in 1981. According to Wikipedia, the album cover contained this: 
Quote:
WARNING: This album contains country & western music and may cause offence to narrow minded listeners.

I don't remember the warning, but I bought it and played it maybe twice. It's grown in stature over the years. I still think it kind of sucks.

"Tonight the Bottle Let Me Down" (originally by Merle Haggard)



PS -- Deb's "In My Room" by Jacob Collier would have fit in this week except it debuted on that "Main Forum" place.
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Graciegirl

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Reply with quote  #18 

Hi Tom

 

Here is my vote this week.. I have only heard one of these songs before.

 

Gold - Whip It - Devo

Silver - Randy Scouse Git - Monkees

Bronze - Lonesome Cowboy Burt – Frank Zappa & The Mother of Invention

Tin - She’s Going Bald - Beach Boys

Graciegirl [smile]

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t bedford

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Reply with quote  #19 
What do Elvis Costello & Zal Yanovsky have in common?

A song written by Virginia Franks, George Jones, and Johnny Mathis:



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bonnie bella

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Reply with quote  #20 
This week would be incomplete without Bjork.  I'm not sure what that thing in a bag at the start of the first video is, but it needs to see a doctor.





This one actually sounds like a song.


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kds

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Reply with quote  #21 
Gold - The Monkeys

Silver - Devo - Never thought I'd ever place them above The Beach Boys.

Bronze - Beach Boys

Tin - Zappa
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Deb#1

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Reply with quote  #22 

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Bizarre, offensive, or satirically entertaining and catchy?  What do you think?

Hey, Tom, that question could be asked of each of these songs not just lonesome Burt’s.  They’re all pretty good.  Zappa’s a new one for me. I remember Yellow Snow being a big hit in our house.  The whole suite was played often by my brother.  I don’t think it was played when the parents were home.

If you want strange and bizarre try:

Quote:
PS -- Deb's "In My Room" by Jacob Collier would have fit in this week except it debuted on that "Main Forum" place.

I didn’t think "In My Room" by Jacob Collier was weird or strange or bizarre though, Frank. Was that your take?

I'm voting early as it is an anything can happen weekend here:
     Gold – "Whip It" – Devo. The second video worked for me.
     Silver – “She's Going Bald" -- Beach Boys. Not appropriate for concerts, but it would be funny to see the reaction to it.
     Bronze – "Randy Scouse Git (aka "Alternative Title") – Monkees.  How is this a reference to Liverpool or did I get that wrong?
     Tin – "Lonesome Cowboy Burt" -- Frank Zappa & the Mothers of Invention

This one definitely deserves a mention [eek]:

Songs about Vegetables and Wind Chimes come to mind as well.


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t bedford

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Reply with quote  #23 
Quote:
 How is this a reference to Liverpool or did I get that wrong?


If we put "randy scouse git" into a British English  to American English translator, it becomes "horny scouse b@st@rd".

And here is the definition of scouse:

Scouse (/ˈskaʊs/; also, in academic sources, called Liverpool English or Merseyside English) is an accent and dialect of English found primarily in the Metropolitan county of Merseyside, and closely associated with the city of Liverpool.


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Tom Tobben

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Reply with quote  #24 
Deb, in addition to t's spot-on comments above, here is more background about the genesis of Mickey Dolenz' song "Randy Scouse Git", as described on Wikipedia:

 

Quote:

According to Dolenz, the song was written about a party that The Beatles threw for the Monkees at the Speakeasy nightclub in London. There are references in the song to the Beatles ("the four kings of EMI") and to other party attendees such as Cass Elliot of The Mamas & the Papas ("the girl in yellow dress")[1] and Dolenz's future wife, Top of the Pops "disc girl" Samantha Juste ("She's a wonderful lady"), ("the being known as Wonder Girl").[2] The verses and chorus do not relate to each other, with the verses whimsically describing the party and the chorus consisting of Dolenz screaming bigoted remarks at an unseen, long-haired youth.

The phrase "Randy Scouse Git", later defined by Dolenz as "something like 'sex-crazed Liverpudlian jerk'",[3] was taken from the 1960s British sitcom Till Death Us Do Part, in which it was regularly used, by the loud-mouthed main character Alf Garnett, played by Cockney actor Warren Mitchell, to insult his Liverpudlian ("Scouse") son-in-law, played by Tony Booth.



I'll be back tomorrow with more comments for those who have voted or shared unusual songs/videos or comments recently. As for tonight, I'm headed shortly to Brian's Pet Sounds concert in the St. Louis suburb of St. Charles, MO. If anything especially noteworthy, or if I get any good photos at the concert, I'll plan to post them in the concert tour section of Brian's website in the next day or two.

 

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Larry Franz

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Reply with quote  #25 
Deb -- I like the Jacob Collier studio version you posted, but it does sound odd or strange to me, especially the first two minutes or so, although not weird or bizarre. -- Frank (that feels odd and strange and even weird)

Speaking of odd Beach Boys covers, David Garland, whom Wikipedia describes as a "singer-songwriter, composer, instrument designer, illustrator, graphic designer, journalist, and former New York City radio personality", recorded an album of Brian's songs in 1993. He had a program called "Spinning on Air" for 28 years and did at least one entire program devoted to "The Wilson Sound". Two tracks from the album:

"'Til I Die"



"I Just Wasn't Made For These Times"



Information about the CD (looks like I could make some money)
https://www.discogs.com/David-Garland-I-Guess-I-Just-Wasnt-Made-For-These-Times-David-Garland-Performs-Brian-Wilson/release/2423490
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John B

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Reply with quote  #26 
thanks, Larry, I had not heard some of these.

Interesting, you find the Costello country album 'suqs'.  It's quite obnoxiously brave though, isn't it?  I mean...it's one thing to do a country covers album but to do THOSE songs, 'Why don't you Love me like you use to do?' 'I'm Your Toy' and 'Good Year for the Roses' etc...that's daring someone to criticize you...and I don't.  Music is subjective true, personal taste, but I know country, grew up with it, and really like this album, still.   Take that song 'Good Year for the Roses' by George Jones.  Love the lines first about the cigarette then the lipstick marks on the coffee cup that you poured but didn't drink, well, at least you thought you wanted it, that's so much more than I can say for me.'   To lyrics matter folks...profound.  Reminds me of the Johnny Ray song written by the Bryants (sorry, I'll get the Cajun spelling wrong for 1st name), "Gee But I'm Lonesome".  ('I light the flame neath my coffee pot, repeat your name til the coffee is hot, it's all the same if it's good or not, gee but I'm lonesome...').  Yes, Elvis makes mediocre records now, but I still like that one.

Regarding the Monkees, I do remember the teenage girl babysitters watching that show in 'real time' when I was a little kid who loved the 'Batman' show and so forth.  They unquestionably had some great songs, like 'Girl I Knew Somewhere' 'Pleasant Valley Sunday' 'I'm a Believer' and 'Daydream Believer' etc.  I only own a best of, but my Beatle-fanatic brothers had all their records and would play the odd tracks all the time, such as paging Bob Dabalina (?), 'For Pete's Sake', etc.  No one is our house ever thought of the Monkees as less than musically sound and a large percentage of my family, though not really me, play musical instruments.
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t bedford

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Reply with quote  #27 
John B, the correct title is "Zilch":

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John B

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Reply with quote  #28 
Thanks, Bedford.  I'd say that qualifies as strange...
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Al Forsyth

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Reply with quote  #29 
Tom,

Tough challenge to organize them but here goes:

Gold to the men from Monkee - a sing-alonger (even with M. Nesmith treating it like a yawner).  The only song that I could get through the entire thing. My new standard for voting. 
Silver - The devolutioners.  They were perfect for their time.  
Bronze - The BB's from SS.  Nuff said.
Tin - sorry Frank. 

Some weirdness - or semi weird:

This could have countered the Devo:

Mr. Davy, pre-Monkees but the song would live again - later

One of the few groups who I thought great in the 80's but it seemed to be really a one-man-Robert-Smith band. Unplugged here and I LOVE this song (and the faux Day In The Life ending) and a fave bass line!

Arlo - cool song

Jimmy was getting weird in the vaudevillian days

Okay - over the weirdness. 

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Larry Franz

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Reply with quote  #30 
John B -- If I had to explain my antipathy toward the Monkees and that Elvis Costello album, I'd try this:

The Monkees' first five singles, released between August 1966 and October 1967, reached #1, #1, #2, #3 and #1 in the US. I was unimpressed by their TV show and resented their radio success. That, of course, was the period in which "Good Vibrations" came out and many of us were waiting for an extraordinary musician to finish Smile. Plus, I was a 15-year old boy around then and we all know what they're like. I could have warmed up to them over the years, but it never happened.

I had a similar negative reaction to Creedence Clearwater Revival when they dominated local radio a couple years later. Between January 1969 and July 1970, their singles went to #2, #2, #2, #3, #2, #4 and #2 (and probably higher in Los Angeles). But I became a fan eventually. Go figure. 

As for Almost Blue, my problem was that I wasn't a country music fan -- although I've grown to love some of it, especially Hank Williams -- so the songs were unfamiliar and Elvis Costello's unique singing voice didn't do anything for them as far as I was concerned.

Speaking of odd:

Laurie Anderson, "O Superman (For Massenet)" and the B-side, "Walk the Dog", 1981



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